keep on smilin' (^_^)

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Take That - These Days (Official Audio)

Take That “These Days” lyrics

Oh I can see the future

Coming to you

Crying with the sadness in your eyes

And I can find a faith in years I’ve wasted

Being around enough to feel alive

And when the world is broken, hurt and colder

No one ever knows the reason why

For the ones we may become

For the balance we have won

For the day we wish the sun

Gonna play it loud tonight

When you dream of a dream

And you live in the world

Every hope is a hope

For the best don’t want you resting my bones

And you’re calling me now

I will see you all the time

Should be out there living the life

And not just watching you

Take me back

Before we all explode

Before we turn to stone

Before the light is gone

Take me back

To where it all began

To where our memories grow

Before the day goes off

Filed under take that TTIII Howard Donald I love Howard Donald these days

42 notes

First reviews of III:

thewayrainfalls:

THESE DAYS

It’s a new beginning for Take That — but not just in formation.

The trio’s “debut” single These Days sounds like nothing we’ve ever heard before from the boys.

It’s a fast-paced, foot-stomping song, which will come across great on the radio and even…

54 notes

wearemadeoutofstars:

| Take That reveal they ‘begged’ Jason Orange not to quit for 12 months before he left
To Take That’s legions of fans it came as a complete shock when Jason Orange sensationally announced he was leaving.
But his bandmates had been expecting it for some time.
It was actually the tail end of last year when Jason first told Gary Barlow, Mark Owen and Howard Donald to go ahead and make plans without him – and they have spent the past 12 months begging him to reconsider.
Speaking of the split for the first time since the announcement, Gary, 43, says they left the studio door wide open for Jason as they began work on a new album.
“We’ve known for a while that Jay was like, ‘I don’t know if I’m doing this or not,’” he says.“At the end of last year we said, ‘We’re going to start, is that OK?’ You can see how you feel during the year. We left a big space for him on the record.”

Finally, last month, the boys sat down for an emotional meeting and Jason told them face to face that he was leaving.
“We hit the point where we could do nothing else,” laments Mark, 42. “Then, it became real.”
A fortnight ago they got together as a foursome one last time to write statements to announce the news.
The group described it as a “sad day for us” and said: “Jason’s energy and belief in what this band could achieve has made it what it is today, and we’ll forever be grateful for his enthusiasm, dedication and inspiration over the years.”
Jason called the others his “brothers”, adding: “There have been no fallings out – only a decision on my part that I no longer wish to do this.”
It’s clearly devastating for the three lads that Jason didn’t change his mind. With Robbie Williams no longer involved, Howard refers to “what’s left of the band” and says of their upcoming releases: “Let’s hope the fans are still there.”
After first forming in 1989, the group have been together on and off ever since with a few different lineups so they shouldn’t be a problem.

However, there have been rumours that Jason’s decision to go was related to a tax controversy surrounding the other three. In May a judge ruled that the Icebreaker partnership Gary, Howard and Mark had been part of since 2010, along with their manager Jonathan Wild, was a tax-avoidance scheme. Jason was not involved and when the announcement of his departure came only weeks after Gary made an apology, speculation of a link was rife.
Asked if that is what’s behind it all , the boys chorus in unison: “No.”
Howard adds: “We’re all great friends. But he’s no longer in love with music, or recording it, or the whole process of it.”
They admit they did consider calling it quits. “It did cross my mind,” says Howard.
“But I would have encouraged the other two to carry on. But I love being in the studio creating music and touring.”
Mark says: “There was a time when we had to get Rob to come back. So we’re quite used to people saying they don’t want to do it any more. Eventually you kinda talk them round and send them flowers. We didn’t send Jason flowers, actually. That’s where we went wrong!”

However, they did invite him to listen to demos of their new album, III, including debut single These Days.
Howard says: “Me and Mark played it to him in the hope he’d think, ‘Yeah I’ll get on board’.”
Writing songs for the new record was clearly influenced by what was going on in the background.
“It was quite downbeat, and we needed to change it to bring more energy to it,” says Mark. “I think Gary said: ‘We’re not writing a retirement record.’
“Then around May, the three of us locked ourselves down for two or three weeks and started to play with sounds and for me that’s when we started for real.
"The energy was more positive. Now it’s one of our most upbeat records.”

Gary says the new album, due out on December 1, is “an amalgamation of the past eight years”.
They’ve worked with a selection of previous producers from different stages of their career.
Now that the trio are all in their forties it’s clearly a more mature sound than their early cheesy pop.
But as Gary’s retirement comment implies, this is not scheduled to be the band’s final album. 

“I could see us going on for another 15 years,” says Mark. Gary goes one better, stressing: “I could see us going in indefinitely.”
But however long it lasts, there will always be room for Jason or Robbie to return.
As Howard insists: “The door is always open.”
-

Source

wearemadeoutofstars:

| Take That reveal they ‘begged’ Jason Orange not to quit for 12 months before he left

To Take That’s legions of fans it came as a complete shock when Jason Orange sensationally announced he was leaving.

But his bandmates had been expecting it for some time.

It was actually the tail end of last year when Jason first told Gary Barlow, Mark Owen and Howard Donald to go ahead and make plans without him – and they have spent the past 12 months begging him to reconsider.

Speaking of the split for the first time since the announcement, Gary, 43, says they left the studio door wide open for Jason as they began work on a new album.

“We’ve known for a while that Jay was like, ‘I don’t know if I’m doing this or not,’” he says.“At the end of last year we said, ‘We’re going to start, is that OK?’ You can see how you feel during the year. We left a big space for him on the record.”

Finally, last month, the boys sat down for an emotional meeting and Jason told them face to face that he was leaving.

“We hit the point where we could do nothing else,” laments Mark, 42. “Then, it became real.”

A fortnight ago they got together as a foursome one last time to write statements to announce the news.

The group described it as a “sad day for us” and said: “Jason’s energy and belief in what this band could achieve has made it what it is today, and we’ll forever be grateful for his enthusiasm, dedication and inspiration over the years.”

Jason called the others his “brothers”, adding: “There have been no fallings out – only a decision on my part that I no longer wish to do this.”

It’s clearly devastating for the three lads that Jason didn’t change his mind. With Robbie Williams no longer involved, Howard refers to “what’s left of the band” and says of their upcoming releases: “Let’s hope the fans are still there.”

After first forming in 1989, the group have been together on and off ever since with a few different lineups so they shouldn’t be a problem.

However, there have been rumours that Jason’s decision to go was related to a tax controversy surrounding the other three. In May a judge ruled that the Icebreaker partnership Gary, Howard and Mark had been part of since 2010, along with their manager Jonathan Wild, was a tax-avoidance scheme. Jason was not involved and when the announcement of his departure came only weeks after Gary made an apology, speculation of a link was rife.

Asked if that is what’s behind it all , the boys chorus in unison: “No.”

Howard adds: “We’re all great friends. But he’s no longer in love with music, or recording it, or the whole process of it.”

They admit they did consider calling it quits. “It did cross my mind,” says Howard.

“But I would have encouraged the other two to carry on. But I love being in the studio creating music and touring.”

Mark says: “There was a time when we had to get Rob to come back. So we’re quite used to people saying they don’t want to do it any more. Eventually you kinda talk them round and send them flowers. We didn’t send Jason flowers, actually. That’s where we went wrong!”

However, they did invite him to listen to demos of their new album, III, including debut single These Days.

Howard says: “Me and Mark played it to him in the hope he’d think, ‘Yeah I’ll get on board’.”

Writing songs for the new record was clearly influenced by what was going on in the background.

“It was quite downbeat, and we needed to change it to bring more energy to it,” says Mark. “I think Gary said: ‘We’re not writing a retirement record.’

“Then around May, the three of us locked ourselves down for two or three weeks and started to play with sounds and for me that’s when we started for real.

"The energy was more positive. Now it’s one of our most upbeat records.”

Gary says the new album, due out on December 1, is “an amalgamation of the past eight years”.

They’ve worked with a selection of previous producers from different stages of their career.

Now that the trio are all in their forties it’s clearly a more mature sound than their early cheesy pop.

But as Gary’s retirement comment implies, this is not scheduled to be the band’s final album.
“I could see us going on for another 15 years,” says Mark. Gary goes one better, stressing: “I could see us going in indefinitely.”

But however long it lasts, there will always be room for Jason or Robbie to return.

As Howard insists: “The door is always open.”

-

75 notes

wearemadeoutofstars:

| TAKE THAT EXCLUSIVE: Despite Jason Orange’s departure the boys vow they’ll go on forever
The nation’s favourite man band return with III on December 1 - their first album as a three-piece following Jason Orange’s shock departure last month.
But calling it a day never once occurred to Gary Barlow, 43, Mark Owen, 42, and Howard Donald, 46.
Daily Star man James Cabooter has been filling in for Jase while Take That put the finishing touches to new music at a London studio.
“We never considered quitting,” confirms Gary Barlow, almost surprised at the suggestion. “I do believe this is just another chapter for us.
“In few more years Rob (Williams) might join us again, Mark might go missing or Howard might go missing.
“I think Take That is a number of people and we know who the five members are, but as long as there are a good number of those in there it will always be Take That.”
Ever the cynic Howard adds dryly: “As long as it doesn’t go down to two!”
That’s not what Mark thinks: “You can’t say there’s a limit to the members, because you never know. It might go down to two or one! Can you imagine one Take That?”
Joking aside the lads have been through the mill this year, hoping and praying their pal Jason, 44, would change his mind and stay on.
“We were hanging on, hoping he would come back,” says Howard turning serious.
“At every opportunity, regardless of whether we were writing in the States, we were like, ‘are you coming?’”
Chief Gary solemnly recalls: “We started the new record just before (last) Christmas, so until two weeks ago we left this big hole for Jay in case he was gonna say, ‘yes I’m in’.”
It’s all been a bit surreal for youngest member Mark: “Sometimes it feels weird like when we did a photo shoot this week and we saw people we’ve known for years; you cant help but think it must be weird for them.”
But the remaining TT members have Jason’s blessing.
“Take That is our most comfortable place, being in this band is a family,” explains Mark.
“Even when we’re not working we see each other, we saw Jay a few weeks ago, we had a sort of goodbye. There’s something nice about coming together.” 
Elder statesman Howard is equally philosophical: “The most important thing is a friendship, so there are no goodbyes really; we are still emailing each other and probably will see each other again in a few weeks.”
“We just want every individual to be happy and if he’s happy not being in the group so be it.”
Strangely the logistics of becoming a trio have been simpler than when Robbie Williams, 40, rejoined Take That for 2010’s Progress album.
“It’s complicated losing a member but you know what, it was complicated gaining a member as well,” ponders Gaz.
“Because we spent the last five or six years as four of us, adding someone was hard and now taking one away is hard as well.
“But we’ll figure it out, we feel ambitious at the moment to prove that we can do this.”
Indeed enough of the sadness, III is a brave new dawn for Take That - one that harks back to the band’s Nineties heyday.
Visibly excited by the new direction Gary: “I feel like we’ve almost come all the way back to the start with this record, the reaction has been like, ‘oh great we are doing pop again’.
“I never felt like we weren’t doing pop, but on Progress I suppose it was a little more leftfield than this.
“But it feels positive and right to do this right now.”
Howard, also a successful DJ says: “Yes it’s upbeat, but we’re not writing a retirement record.”
“It’s so pop it’s almost punk,” adds Mark, who jokingly calls their new III album “aye” because of the Roman numerals.
“It feels like the type of record we had to make because we’ve been away for quite some time and lots has gone on. I love the energy we’ve brought to it, it gives us a little kick up the bum as well.”
Despite the dancier pop direction this is no midlife crisis album.
Laughing Gary: “My wife always says joining the band again was my mid-life crisis, so it’s been going on quite a while.”
Take That’s Progress tour of 2011 smashed box office records culminating in eight sell-out shows at Wembley Stadium.
A new tour is already in the works, but the lads are thinking smaller next time.
“The way I feel for the last seven years our audiences have stood in fields being rained on,” says charitable Gary.
“I would love to play a concert where they get a seat and not get wet, so arenas would be the plan - something more intimate.”
Mark isn’t so sure: “But I do like stadiums because I like big shows and having a day out. This album was written with concerts in mind.”
Wherever they end up you just know there’ll be a few emotional moments for absent friends.
“There’s going to have to be a lot of tributes to friends,” laughs Mark.
“Will you please be upstanding for…,” chuckles Gary in his best London accent.
“In all seriousness this is a positive record, a new challenge for us, but it feels right.”
It’s reassuring to know Take That will always be back for good.
-
Source

this is no midlife crisis album :)

wearemadeoutofstars:

| TAKE THAT EXCLUSIVE: Despite Jason Orange’s departure the boys vow they’ll go on forever

The nation’s favourite man band return with III on December 1 - their first album as a three-piece following Jason Orange’s shock departure last month.

But calling it a day never once occurred to Gary Barlow, 43, Mark Owen, 42, and Howard Donald, 46.

Daily Star man James Cabooter has been filling in for Jase while Take That put the finishing touches to new music at a London studio.

“We never considered quitting,” confirms Gary Barlow, almost surprised at the suggestion. “I do believe this is just another chapter for us.

“In few more years Rob (Williams) might join us again, Mark might go missing or Howard might go missing.

“I think Take That is a number of people and we know who the five members are, but as long as there are a good number of those in there it will always be Take That.”

Ever the cynic Howard adds dryly: “As long as it doesn’t go down to two!”

That’s not what Mark thinks: “You can’t say there’s a limit to the members, because you never know. It might go down to two or one! Can you imagine one Take That?”

Joking aside the lads have been through the mill this year, hoping and praying their pal Jason, 44, would change his mind and stay on.

“We were hanging on, hoping he would come back,” says Howard turning serious.

“At every opportunity, regardless of whether we were writing in the States, we were like, ‘are you coming?’”

Chief Gary solemnly recalls: “We started the new record just before (last) Christmas, so until two weeks ago we left this big hole for Jay in case he was gonna say, ‘yes I’m in’.”

It’s all been a bit surreal for youngest member Mark: “Sometimes it feels weird like when we did a photo shoot this week and we saw people we’ve known for years; you cant help but think it must be weird for them.”

But the remaining TT members have Jason’s blessing.

“Take That is our most comfortable place, being in this band is a family,” explains Mark.

“Even when we’re not working we see each other, we saw Jay a few weeks ago, we had a sort of goodbye. There’s something nice about coming together.”

Elder statesman Howard is equally philosophical: “The most important thing is a friendship, so there are no goodbyes really; we are still emailing each other and probably will see each other again in a few weeks.”

“We just want every individual to be happy and if he’s happy not being in the group so be it.”

Strangely the logistics of becoming a trio have been simpler than when Robbie Williams, 40, rejoined Take That for 2010’s Progress album.

“It’s complicated losing a member but you know what, it was complicated gaining a member as well,” ponders Gaz.

“Because we spent the last five or six years as four of us, adding someone was hard and now taking one away is hard as well.

“But we’ll figure it out, we feel ambitious at the moment to prove that we can do this.”

Indeed enough of the sadness, III is a brave new dawn for Take That - one that harks back to the band’s Nineties heyday.

Visibly excited by the new direction Gary: “I feel like we’ve almost come all the way back to the start with this record, the reaction has been like, ‘oh great we are doing pop again’.

“I never felt like we weren’t doing pop, but on Progress I suppose it was a little more leftfield than this.

“But it feels positive and right to do this right now.”

Howard, also a successful DJ says: “Yes it’s upbeat, but we’re not writing a retirement record.”

“It’s so pop it’s almost punk,” adds Mark, who jokingly calls their new III album “aye” because of the Roman numerals.

“It feels like the type of record we had to make because we’ve been away for quite some time and lots has gone on. I love the energy we’ve brought to it, it gives us a little kick up the bum as well.”

Despite the dancier pop direction this is no midlife crisis album.

Laughing Gary: “My wife always says joining the band again was my mid-life crisis, so it’s been going on quite a while.”

Take That’s Progress tour of 2011 smashed box office records culminating in eight sell-out shows at Wembley Stadium.

A new tour is already in the works, but the lads are thinking smaller next time.

“The way I feel for the last seven years our audiences have stood in fields being rained on,” says charitable Gary.

“I would love to play a concert where they get a seat and not get wet, so arenas would be the plan - something more intimate.”

Mark isn’t so sure: “But I do like stadiums because I like big shows and having a day out. This album was written with concerts in mind.”

Wherever they end up you just know there’ll be a few emotional moments for absent friends.

“There’s going to have to be a lot of tributes to friends,” laughs Mark.

“Will you please be upstanding for…,” chuckles Gary in his best London accent.

“In all seriousness this is a positive record, a new challenge for us, but it feels right.”

It’s reassuring to know Take That will always be back for good.

-

Source

this is no midlife crisis album :)

Filed under take that TT III

16 notes

Thank you, Jay. Good bye. We’ll miss you

I thought that after 13 Feb 1996, I would be ok if they decide to disband after the second time round. No it’s not. I still feel heartbroken from yesterday news, sad news.
Good luck Jay! - Your Loyal fan.

Thank you, Jay. Good bye. We’ll miss you

I thought that after 13 Feb 1996, I would be ok if they decide to disband after the second time round. No it’s not. I still feel heartbroken from yesterday news, sad news.
Good luck Jay! - Your Loyal fan.

Filed under jason orange take that